Archives for July 2014

‘Phonological Contrastive Analysis of Supra-Segmental Features RP and GIE with Special Focus on Gujarati Phonology’ by Paresh Joshi

Abstract

Present paper is an endeavour to investigate underlying differences in supra-segmental features of Received Pronunciation (RP) and General Indian English (GIE), particularly Gujarati English Phonology (GEP). The analysis takes into consideration peculiar features of all the three phonologies i.e. RP, GIE and phonology of Gujarati English.

Although a contrastive analysis of RP and GIE will bring out gross phonological peculiarities of all the Indian Speakers of English including Gujarati Speakers of English (GSE), the rationale for such a contrastive analysis is to arrive at gross phonological features which are very peculiar to GSE under the influence of Gujarati phonology with a view to devising pedagogical strategies to resolve pronunciation problems pertaining to supra-segmental phonology there by enhancing the international intelligibility of GSE.

Key words: Contrastive Analysis, Supra-Segmental Phonology, Received Pronunciation (RP), General Indian English (GIE), Gujarati English Phonology (GEP), Non-native speakers (NNS), Guajarati Speakers of English

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‘Soft Skills Training – Necessity or Hype’ by Alireza Sohrabi, Fatemeh Alipanahi & Mohammad Reza Orouji

Abstract

Lecturing as a subcategory of speaking performance is one of the essential and inevitable needs of students in various academic fields, particularly for EFL students. There are multiple determinant factors which can affect lecturing and speaking performances. In this study, two important factors such as self-esteem and lexical knowledge were investigated. The current study aimed to compare the relationship among the three variables of self-esteem, lexical knowledge, and lecturing. Our purpose was to observe how students with different levels of self-esteem and with varying mastery in lexical knowledge would deliver their lectures and to know if these two factors really affect lecturing.  In so doing, a standard Cambridge lexical knowledge test as well as Sorensen self-esteem test were conducted. Accordingly, the students were divided into four groups. The analyses of the obtained data indicated a statistically significant differences among the students with: 1) high lexical knowledge – high self-esteem and students with 2) high lexical knowledge-low-esteem and students with 3) low lexical knowledge-low self-esteem and students with 4) low lexical knowledge-high self-esteem. The groups with high lexical knowledge outperformed the low lexical knowledge group. The findings of the current study can have beneficial conceptions for both second language students and teachers particularly those who fail to find out the defects in the requirements of oral performances such as inadequate lexical knowledge.

Key words: Self-esteem, Lexical Knowledge, Lecturing

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‘Soft Skills Training – Necessity or Hype’ by T. Rama & Dr. Roopa Suzana

Abstract

This paper aims to highlight the importance of soft skills to survive in society and, more so, in someone’s work life. Industries realize this and so organize soft skills training for their employees for the first six months or one year as the case may be. This need for soft skills training is felt not just in India but also in the US, UK and Australia. This paper emphasizes that soft skills training is essential and all employees have no choice but to go through it at sometimes or the other. In fact, research suggests that experienced employees too require this kind of training.

Key Words: soft skills, employability Skills, Emotional Quotient, Training

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‘Freedom of the Mind’ by Samira Al Hosni

Abstract

This paper outlines some of my beliefs regarding education. First, it highlights a general idea of what education means to me. It presents some of the main principles of constructivism and experiential learning theories and how they are related to education and learning in general. Issues regarding how technology-mediated learning supports education are presented as well. A kind of connection between the three aspects—constructivism, experiential learning, and technology—and their strong relation to education are pointed out. Additionally, examples of how these beliefs can be applied in our profession are provided.

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