Archives for March 2015

‘Review of the Effectiveness of Written Corrective Feedback in an ESL Context’ by Talal M. Amara

Abstract

While written corrective feedback (WCF) has frequently been identified as a common teacher practice in teaching writing in an L2 classroom, ESL teachers pay little attention to the effectiveness of it. The role of written corrective feedback (WCF) in English as a second language context has been a controversial topic among instructors as well as researchers. Although WCF is a widely used, and is a common pedagogical tool in second language (L2) classroom, there are a number of practical and theoretical objections to its effectiveness in writing classroom. This review is to shed light on the debate on the effectiveness of WCF in the ESL writing classroom. It will summarize the theoretical arguments underpinning the use of WCF in L2 classrooms. That is, the objections raised against WCF are reviewed, and some concerns of different WCF types are also discussed.

Over the last few years, the role played by corrective feedback in language acquisition has become a highly controversial issue. In the field of First Language Acquisition (FLA), researchers express strong reservations concerning the effect that negative evidence has on FLA, if there is any at all. In the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA), however, there appears to be a growing consensus among the majority of researchers concerning the significance of the role played by negative evidence in the process of SLA. This literature review will focus mainly on the role played by corrective feedback in SLA. While corrective feedback clearly relates to both oral and written discourse, the focus of this discussion will center on oral production, since the preponderance of research has largely focused on this aspect. In the following sections of this review, the meaning of corrective feedback will be discussed, and the different theoretical stances towards its role in SLA examined. Empirical studies that explore the impact corrective feedback has on SLA will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of some of the issues that loom large in research in the area of corrective feedback and its role in SLA

Index Terms: SLA, WCF, FLA.

Access full paper.

‘Visuals and their Effect in Listening Comprehension’ by Shemal P. Mevada & Sunil Shah

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of listening comprehension and types of visuals which can be used in listening comprehension. It also talks about the effects of different visuals on the result of ESL (English as a Second Language) students in listening comprehension by reviewing previous studies.

Index Terms: listening comprehension, ESL.

Access full paper.

‘The Significance of Pragmatics in English Language Teaching’ by Amin Alinezhad

Abstract

This paper demonstrates that pragmatics should be viewed as a branch of linguistics and its significant role in English as a second language. In pragmatics, meaning in communication has an important role and it can be categorized into two ele-ments such as verbal and nonverbal. It depends on various contexts, relationship between utterers, and social factors. Nowadays English plays a key role in the world and it is known as an international language which enables people to connect all around the world and English can be called as a global language because it is helpful in the processes of globalization. As English has played an indispensable role in global communication, it is essential for English language users, both native and non-native, to use clear, comprehensible and educated English that allows smooth communication and avoids misunder-standings in social interactions. Hence, pragmatic competence can facilitate language users to successfully achieve their communicative aims in intercultural communication. Consequently, pragmatic elements have noticeable roles in communication between speakers because such elements can hinder inaccuracies and misunderstandings during communication. Teachers should teach pragmatic competence in second language English classes through different activities and tasks.

Index Terms: pragmatics, pragmatics competence, English language teaching, language competencies.

Access full paper.

‘Teaching Pronunciation to Gujarati Learners of English: Problems and Solutions’ by Dr. Paresh Joshi

Abstract

There are obvious issues with regard to teaching pronunciation to Gujarati Speakers of English (GSE). These issues have its root in the inherent difference between the phonology of Gujarati and English at both segmental and supra-segmental level. There is sufficient research evidence to prove that these phonological differences are largely responsible for problems in teaching English pronunciation. To add to this, issues concerning to speaker’s culture and identity also stand in the way of successful acquisition of pronunciation. Due to this phonological difference, GSE tend to show significant amount of negative L1 transfer while speaking in English. It is this presence of L1 transfer which renders the GSEs unintelligible in global communication. The present paper lists phonological as well as non-phonological issues which require attention while teaching pronunciation to GSE. Moreover, the paper also endeavours to provide pedagogical solutions for effective teaching of pronunciation considering geopolitical realties of Gujarat. Besides, the paper also aims at proposing solutions considering educational practices in Gujarat state. The proposed solutions will largely focus on reduction of L1 by effective teaching of pronunciation aimed at enhancing international intelligibility of GSEs.

Index Terms: Contrastive Analysis, Segmental Phonology, Supra-Segmental Phonology, Received Pronunciation (RP), General Indian English (GIE), Gujarati English Phonology (GEP), Non-native speakers (NNS), Gujarati Speakers of English

Access full paper.

‘A Critical Review of Jenifer Jenkins’s Lingua Franca Core in the Context of English as an International Language’ by PARESH JOSHI

Abstract

The present paper primarily endeavours to critically review the efficacy of Lingua Franca Core (LFC) by Jenifer Jenkins in the emerging contents of English as an International Language (EIL). There is hardly any consensus on norms for teaching pronunciation among the researchers. There is an increasing amount of protest against the use of Received Pronunciation (RP) as universal norm for teaching pronunciation in favour of non-native speakers (NNS) who are an English speaking majority today. The NNSs out outnumber the native speakers by a huge margin. Bearing in mind the majority of NNSs, Jenkins argues against the hegemony of the native standards for teaching pronunciation and very strongly maintains that the standardization of norms should take in to consideration NNSs. Considering the prevailing contexts of EIL, she proposes LFC as a solution which according to her is simplified version of RP and takes into account evolving contexts of English in Outer and Expanding circles. The
paper critically examines LFC as whole by evaluating proposed seven priority areas for teaching pronunciation for facilitating international intelligibility in English. The paper also examines how much it deviates from RP in favour of NNSs. Finally, the paper would try to answer whether LFC is useful to NNSs for attaining international intelligibility in English.

Index Terms: Lingua Franca Core (LFC), Inter language Talk (ILT), International Intelligibility,
Received Pronunciation (PR), Common Core, Universal Norms, Native Speaker (NS), Non-Native
Speaker (NNS)

Access full paper.

‘Developing Dictionary Skills among Primary Pre-service Teachers’ by Dr. Kirankumar I. Chauhan

Abstract

For learners in L2 context dictionaries are often considered to be primary source of enriching vocabulary. In spite of dictionaries’ wider acceptance as a handy tool in second language learning, not much attention is paid towards formal training to use and develop dictionary skills among learners, especially in the context of Gujarat if the not the entire nation. This study is an attempt to train the primary pre-service teachers to become familiar with the purposes and utilities that dictionaries offer. Hence, the present paper reports a tryout carried out at DIET (District Institute of Education and Training) in Anand district, Gujarat. The aim of the project primarily was to develop dictionary skills among the preservice teachers.

Index Terms: Dictionary skills, Reference skills

Access full paper.