‘Phonological Contrastive Analysis of Supra-Segmental Features RP and GIE with Special Focus on Gujarati Phonology’ by Paresh Joshi

Abstract

Present paper is an endeavour to investigate underlying differences in supra-segmental features of Received Pronunciation (RP) and General Indian English (GIE), particularly Gujarati English Phonology (GEP). The analysis takes into consideration peculiar features of all the three phonologies i.e. RP, GIE and phonology of Gujarati English.

Although a contrastive analysis of RP and GIE will bring out gross phonological peculiarities of all the Indian Speakers of English including Gujarati Speakers of English (GSE), the rationale for such a contrastive analysis is to arrive at gross phonological features which are very peculiar to GSE under the influence of Gujarati phonology with a view to devising pedagogical strategies to resolve pronunciation problems pertaining to supra-segmental phonology there by enhancing the international intelligibility of GSE.

Key words: Contrastive Analysis, Supra-Segmental Phonology, Received Pronunciation (RP), General Indian English (GIE), Gujarati English Phonology (GEP), Non-native speakers (NNS), Guajarati Speakers of English

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‘Soft Skills Training – Necessity or Hype’ by Alireza Sohrabi, Fatemeh Alipanahi & Mohammad Reza Orouji

Abstract

Lecturing as a subcategory of speaking performance is one of the essential and inevitable needs of students in various academic fields, particularly for EFL students. There are multiple determinant factors which can affect lecturing and speaking performances. In this study, two important factors such as self-esteem and lexical knowledge were investigated. The current study aimed to compare the relationship among the three variables of self-esteem, lexical knowledge, and lecturing. Our purpose was to observe how students with different levels of self-esteem and with varying mastery in lexical knowledge would deliver their lectures and to know if these two factors really affect lecturing.  In so doing, a standard Cambridge lexical knowledge test as well as Sorensen self-esteem test were conducted. Accordingly, the students were divided into four groups. The analyses of the obtained data indicated a statistically significant differences among the students with: 1) high lexical knowledge – high self-esteem and students with 2) high lexical knowledge-low-esteem and students with 3) low lexical knowledge-low self-esteem and students with 4) low lexical knowledge-high self-esteem. The groups with high lexical knowledge outperformed the low lexical knowledge group. The findings of the current study can have beneficial conceptions for both second language students and teachers particularly those who fail to find out the defects in the requirements of oral performances such as inadequate lexical knowledge.

Key words: Self-esteem, Lexical Knowledge, Lecturing

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‘Soft Skills Training – Necessity or Hype’ by T. Rama & Dr. Roopa Suzana

Abstract

This paper aims to highlight the importance of soft skills to survive in society and, more so, in someone’s work life. Industries realize this and so organize soft skills training for their employees for the first six months or one year as the case may be. This need for soft skills training is felt not just in India but also in the US, UK and Australia. This paper emphasizes that soft skills training is essential and all employees have no choice but to go through it at sometimes or the other. In fact, research suggests that experienced employees too require this kind of training.

Key Words: soft skills, employability Skills, Emotional Quotient, Training

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‘Freedom of the Mind’ by Samira Al Hosni

Abstract

This paper outlines some of my beliefs regarding education. First, it highlights a general idea of what education means to me. It presents some of the main principles of constructivism and experiential learning theories and how they are related to education and learning in general. Issues regarding how technology-mediated learning supports education are presented as well. A kind of connection between the three aspects—constructivism, experiential learning, and technology—and their strong relation to education are pointed out. Additionally, examples of how these beliefs can be applied in our profession are provided.

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‘Regional Impact on English Speaking: How to reduce it holistically’ by Reena Mittal

Abstract

Mother tongue effect and its impact and effectiveness in English language speaking cannot be overlooked.  But this mother tongue effect is sometimes very prominent in different regions. The paper studies some pronunciation problems which are commonly found in some particular areas of the country. In the end, the paper will try to give some solutions to the problems.

Keywords: Equipped, Hurdles, Regionalism, Symbols, Linguistically.

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‘Application of Dynamic Assessment in Second and Foreign Language Teaching’ by Soudabeh Tabatabaei & Morteza Bakhtiarvand

Abstract

A test is first a method and that method generally requires some performances or activities on the part of either the testee or the tester or both. Testing is an inextricable part of the instructional process. If a test is to provide meaningful information on which teachers and administrators can base their decisions, then many variables and concerns must be considered. No EFL program can deny the significance of testing for evaluating learner’s acquisition of the target language. This study reports on the use of an innovative assessment, dynamic assessment (DA), in EFL and ESL contexts. It can empower educators to become researchers when they implement and further investigate this innovative approach to language assessment. The present article is a literature review which aims to look critically at the emergence of DA as an alternative approach to the previous traditional approaches. Also, after taking a look at the theoretical framework as well as different models of DA, the researchers compare dynamic and non-dynamic assessments as well as the application and implication of DA in the scope of language teaching and language testing.

Index Terms — dynamic Assessment (DA), models of DA, traditional assessment

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‘Effectiveness of Students’ Evaluation of Teaching from the Viewpoint of Iranian Graduate Students’ by Fereshteh Shirzad, Khorshid Mousavi & Bita Asadi

Abstract

Due to the significance of evaluating teaching effectiveness based on reliable and valid instruments, this study was conducted to identify dimensions of teaching effectiveness from Iranian graduate students’ perspectives. This study adopted an exploratory descriptive design. Participants were 100 graduate students at an Iranian University. A twelve-item format questionnaire was the main instrument for data collection. The data collected was then subjected to factor analysis, and a model produced of teaching effectiveness. The findings suggest that how much students perceive their lecturers as an efficacious teacher is an important predictor of Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET) scores. The study presents a challenge to the use of SET in an Iranian University and, in particular, raises questions of fairness if such ratings are to be used in decisions relating to employment issues. The finding suggests that SET be applied cautiously in faculty performance evaluation. The SET ratings were demonstrated to be significantly affected by the students’ perception of the lecturer as a result of that questioning the validity of this particular scale. Further, they raise questions about how the effect of confounding variables can be minimized by that means increasing the validity of SET ratings. However, the findings could be argued to be likely to generalize to most teaching assessment instruments on the basis of the prevalence of the halo effect.

Key words: Charisma, Course Attributes, Lecture Attributes, Student Evaluation of Teaching

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‘Iranian Children’s Systematic Sentential Word Order within P & P Model’ by Masoome Zolfaghari & Ahmad Reza Lotfi

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore whether (a) sentential word order in Persian speaking children under the age of school is significant and systematic and (b) there are any significant differences between children and adults with regard to their sentential word order. In order to collect the relevant data 30 Iranian males (3-5) year of age participated. A pictorial book was given to them to take a look at its pictures and narrate the story in their own sentences. Their sentences recorded and transcribed for syntactical analyses. Sentences classified as (statements, imperatives, negative, active, passive, interrogative, exclamatory and declarative).The results investigated and analyzed within P&P model .The results show that in this sample and small group, there are some salient differences between Persian adults and children at the time of producing and uttering different kind of sentences.

Keywords: Language Acquisition, Sentential Word Order, Persian Children, P&P Model

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‘The Effect of Text Modality on the Vocabulary Retention of EFL Students’ by Rahil Sheibani, Hajar Khanmohammad & Mojtaba Moradi

Abstract

The majority of research studies on vocabulary had defined the incremental stages in vocabulary acquisition and also highlighted the new ways of learning vocabulary or outlined learner autonomy, vocabulary learning strategies. This present research sought to investigate the effect of input modality on the advanced EFL learners’ vocabulary retention rate. For this purpose, from among advanced EFL learners in Rahiyan-e Elm language institute in Shiraz, Iran, 60 students were selected based on their scores in the proficiency test. They were randomly divided to 2 equal groups. These two groups took part in vocabulary test which was regarded as a pre-test. Then, the first group worked on vocabulary trough listening (oral input) and the second group received vocabulary training via reading (visual input) within 3 sessions. After treatments both groups took part in the post-test. It was found that there is no significant difference in vocabulary retention of advanced Iranian EFL learners receiving oral versus those receiving visual input.

Keyword: modality, vocabulary retention, visual input, oral input

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