‘A Study of English Language Achievements in Reading Skill of Arts And Science College Students in Dindigul District with Special Reference to Residence of the Students’ by S. Naga Sujatha

Abstract

This study investigates an important area of English language teaching and learning. It examines the present situation of teaching reading skills of English, the problems students encounter during reading in English and the learners’ proficiency level of reading skills when they are at under graduate degree. The study discusses the recent developments in reading pedagogy. It also presents testing and evaluation of different sub-skills of reading with reference to geographic status. The empirical study includes students’ questionnaire survey, observation and administering reading tests.

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‘Phonemics and Second Language Learners: A longitudinal study in the context of Arab learners of English’ by Syed Sarwar Hussain

Abstract

This study examines the importance of phonemics in ascertaining and defining the distinctive aspect of language learning with special reference to the Arab Learners of English as a second language. It focuses, at the onset, on the pronunciation of words in shaping and molding ability and understanding in the learning of the target language. It also shows how pronunciation plays the pivotal role of articulating language and what is often termed as ‘language melody’. In this respect the study also underscores the phonemic mix-up of regional accent, immigrant accent and the native accent in the process of second language learning. It also shows how phonemics can play a positive and pivotal role, in building up and evolving language skills. My approach has been to understand and interpret my understanding of the importance of phonology, and the positive and creative resources of language as the most powerful vehicle for social harmony.  The natural or primary medium of human language is sound. In this respect, the study of sound is of more central importance to language learning than any other language skill, be it writing, reading or whatever. I have, therefore, tried to understand the acquisition of the sound system of the target language in the background of the social structure where it is taught.

Keywords: Phonetics, phonemics, language shifts, accents, sound patterns

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‘Activity Based Learning in the Government Degree Colleges of Telangana’ by Roopna Ravindran

Abstract

This paper discusses the possibility of activities that can be used in Communicative English Grammar Classrooms.  The research explores the benefits of such activity based classes for vernacular medium undergraduate students in Telangana (India). English Grammar remains to be an area difficult to tackle for this group of students.  The attention span of these students seems to be very less when it is a one to one lecture method delivered in English. Learning is encouraged through activities done in pair and group work can work wonders for these students.

The main objective of this study is to help undergraduate students learn communicative grammar through activity based learning. Activities can create curiosity in students and this slowly will lead to an interest towards learning Communicative English Grammar. Activities conducted in pairs and groups help students to shed their inhibitions. No single person is made to face the class directly. Peer review is practised and each and every opinion is taken well into consideration.

Activities to learn Tenses, Prepositions, Speech, and Voices etc. are discussed upon and an analysis of the feedback is also made.  Activities help students to reinforce the grammar techniques in their mind and also later relate them into real life situations. They make students interact with fellow classmates. So without literally imbibing the rules of grammar students are made to communicate in the activity based platform.

Keywords: Activity, Learning Methodology, Grammar, Pair, Group

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‘The Effect of Social Status on Complaint Strategies by Iranian EFL learners and English native speakers’ by Soudabeh Tabatabaei & Dr. M. Balakumar

Abstract

This study aims to investigate the type of complaint strategies employed by Iranian EFL learners and English native speakers in complaint interactions in different social status (higher, lower, equal). Thirty Iranian EFL learners and 30 English native speakers participated in the study. Discourse completion task (DCT) as an open-ended questionnaire was administered to them to elicit the required data. Then, the gathered data were analyzed according to modified taxonomy of complaint proposed by Murphy and Neu (1996) involving complaint, justification, criticism, explanation of purpose and ‎candidates’ solution: Demand / Request.  In addition, three other strategies were added to this taxonomy i.e. sarcasm, threat and apology. The results indicated that social status of interlocutor had a great influence on strategy choice by participants of two groups. There is a hope that this study can contribute to our understanding of complaint strategies and help language teachers make aware of the existing discrepancies between English native speakers and Iranian EFL learners in realization of complaint strategies.

Keywords: Speech act, complaint strategies, DCT, social status, English native speakers, Iranian EFL learners

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‘Gender Variation in Vocabulary Teaching and Learning’ by H. Renolyn Jeyanth

Abstract

Language is one of the wonderful gifts given by God to humanity. It is with the help of language that man is able to communicate and solve a number of his problems and has been able to make a lot of achievements in life. It is also important in our lives dominating our social and cognitive process. It is the fulcrum of education, functioning as the medium of communication between students and teachers and students and textbooks. In this paper, let us find whether there is any gender variation influence in the teaching and learning of the vocabulary.

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‘Role of Intercultural Approach to English Language Teaching in the Indian Context: A Theoretical Exploration’ by Namita Singhal

Abstract

This article analyzes the linguistic scenario in India, which is multilingual and multicultural. Every linguistic community in the country has its unique history and identity. Acceptability of a language countrywide is a distant possibility, as is evident from the case of Hindi and the failure of the three language formula.  In this situation, English, a foreign language, having tremendous instrumental value is firmly set to serve the purpose of the link language of the country, a situation not agreeable to the nationalistic sentiments. It raises concerns of linguistic imperialism, too. The author of the paper builds up a case wherein an intercultural approach to English language teaching is shown to have potential to cater to the linguistic needs of the country, while preserving its diverse  indigenous languages.

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