‘Using Rhymes and Songs for Teaching Core Vocabulary to Elementary School Students’ by Gareebullah Hago Hamdoun Mudawi

Abstract

The study tries to make use of the songs and nursery rhymes as educational tools through which core vocabulary can be taught and understood to the children of elementary schools. The study was conducted at Altadreeb basic level schools at Shundi University in Sudan. The girls at the 6th grade were chosen as the experimental group for the study, while the boys in the same grade represented the control group. The present study exposes the experimental group to selected songs and rhymes in teaching core vocabulary, and to compare their outcomes with the control group to investigate the effectiveness of using songs and rhymes as a viable strategy for teaching core vocabulary to the students of elementary level. The  influence of  rhymes  on  the affective filter is discussed; it is  argued  that  songs can  increase learners’ motivation  and  self –confidence  while lowering  their  apprehension. In  addition, the  paper considers  whether  songs  are  a useful technique  on their own  in  imparting lexical knowledge,  and  if good  pronunciation may support vocabulary learning. Similarly, the flexibility of the verses’ repetitive rhythm is introduced as a substantial strategy through which memorization and retention of words are facilitated. The study  concludes  that  songs  in language  classrooms can  bring about  a flexible affective filter and  are  undoubtedly helpful in  learning  different  aspects  of lexical knowledge.  The study proved that songs and rhymes make learning fun and fuse learning and play to ensure that students are engaged and absorbing information.

Index terms: core vocabulary, nursery rhymes, songs strategy, lexical knowledge, language acquisition device.

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‘Code-Switching and Code-Mixing’ by Dr. Iesar Ahmad, Dr. Mohammed Mahmoud Talal Mohaidat & Dr. Kesavan Vadakalur Elumalai

Abstract

This study is an attempt on Code-switching and Code-mixing strategies in English language and literature teaching at the Under Graduate level at the king Saudi University. In addition, it explores how such linguistic practices can be more productive and effective in terms of enhancing the linguistic proficiency and literary understanding among the young Saudi learners. Likewise, this study would be analyzed in the discourse analysis perspectives. The study concludes that such linguistic practices are very effective, productive and objective oriented in terms of motivating the young Saudi learner for the acquisition of second/foreign language and an ability to interpret the literary texts.

Index Terms: English language, code-switching; code-mixing; motivation.

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‘Review of the Effectiveness of Written Corrective Feedback in an ESL Context’ by Talal M. Amara

Abstract

While written corrective feedback (WCF) has frequently been identified as a common teacher practice in teaching writing in an L2 classroom, ESL teachers pay little attention to the effectiveness of it. The role of written corrective feedback (WCF) in English as a second language context has been a controversial topic among instructors as well as researchers. Although WCF is a widely used, and is a common pedagogical tool in second language (L2) classroom, there are a number of practical and theoretical objections to its effectiveness in writing classroom. This review is to shed light on the debate on the effectiveness of WCF in the ESL writing classroom. It will summarize the theoretical arguments underpinning the use of WCF in L2 classrooms. That is, the objections raised against WCF are reviewed, and some concerns of different WCF types are also discussed.

Over the last few years, the role played by corrective feedback in language acquisition has become a highly controversial issue. In the field of First Language Acquisition (FLA), researchers express strong reservations concerning the effect that negative evidence has on FLA, if there is any at all. In the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA), however, there appears to be a growing consensus among the majority of researchers concerning the significance of the role played by negative evidence in the process of SLA. This literature review will focus mainly on the role played by corrective feedback in SLA. While corrective feedback clearly relates to both oral and written discourse, the focus of this discussion will center on oral production, since the preponderance of research has largely focused on this aspect. In the following sections of this review, the meaning of corrective feedback will be discussed, and the different theoretical stances towards its role in SLA examined. Empirical studies that explore the impact corrective feedback has on SLA will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of some of the issues that loom large in research in the area of corrective feedback and its role in SLA

Index Terms: SLA, WCF, FLA.

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‘Visuals and their Effect in Listening Comprehension’ by Shemal P. Mevada & Sunil Shah

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of listening comprehension and types of visuals which can be used in listening comprehension. It also talks about the effects of different visuals on the result of ESL (English as a Second Language) students in listening comprehension by reviewing previous studies.

Index Terms: listening comprehension, ESL.

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‘The Significance of Pragmatics in English Language Teaching’ by Amin Alinezhad

Abstract

This paper demonstrates that pragmatics should be viewed as a branch of linguistics and its significant role in English as a second language. In pragmatics, meaning in communication has an important role and it can be categorized into two ele-ments such as verbal and nonverbal. It depends on various contexts, relationship between utterers, and social factors. Nowadays English plays a key role in the world and it is known as an international language which enables people to connect all around the world and English can be called as a global language because it is helpful in the processes of globalization. As English has played an indispensable role in global communication, it is essential for English language users, both native and non-native, to use clear, comprehensible and educated English that allows smooth communication and avoids misunder-standings in social interactions. Hence, pragmatic competence can facilitate language users to successfully achieve their communicative aims in intercultural communication. Consequently, pragmatic elements have noticeable roles in communication between speakers because such elements can hinder inaccuracies and misunderstandings during communication. Teachers should teach pragmatic competence in second language English classes through different activities and tasks.

Index Terms: pragmatics, pragmatics competence, English language teaching, language competencies.

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‘Teaching Pronunciation to Gujarati Learners of English: Problems and Solutions’ by Dr. Paresh Joshi

Abstract

There are obvious issues with regard to teaching pronunciation to Gujarati Speakers of English (GSE). These issues have its root in the inherent difference between the phonology of Gujarati and English at both segmental and supra-segmental level. There is sufficient research evidence to prove that these phonological differences are largely responsible for problems in teaching English pronunciation. To add to this, issues concerning to speaker’s culture and identity also stand in the way of successful acquisition of pronunciation. Due to this phonological difference, GSE tend to show significant amount of negative L1 transfer while speaking in English. It is this presence of L1 transfer which renders the GSEs unintelligible in global communication. The present paper lists phonological as well as non-phonological issues which require attention while teaching pronunciation to GSE. Moreover, the paper also endeavours to provide pedagogical solutions for effective teaching of pronunciation considering geopolitical realties of Gujarat. Besides, the paper also aims at proposing solutions considering educational practices in Gujarat state. The proposed solutions will largely focus on reduction of L1 by effective teaching of pronunciation aimed at enhancing international intelligibility of GSEs.

Index Terms: Contrastive Analysis, Segmental Phonology, Supra-Segmental Phonology, Received Pronunciation (RP), General Indian English (GIE), Gujarati English Phonology (GEP), Non-native speakers (NNS), Gujarati Speakers of English

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Volume 5 – Issue 1

  1. Self-Assessment of Oral Proficiency among ESL Learners
    Author/s: Dr. Smriti Singh
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  2. Relationship between Psychological Theories and Recent Trends in Language Teaching: Some Observations
    Author/s: Dr. B. Sushma
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  3. Teaching Pronunciation to Gujarati Learners of English: Problems and Solutions
    Author/s: Dr. Paresh Joshi
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  4. The Significance of Pragmatics in English Language Teaching
    Author/s: Amin Alinezhad
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  5. Visuals and their Effect in Listening Comprehension
    Author/s: Shemal P. Mevada & Sunil Shah
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  6. Review of the Effectiveness of Written Corrective Feedback in an ESL Context
    Author/s: Talal M. Amara
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  7. Code-Switching and Code-Mixing
    Author/s: Dr. Iesar Ahmad, Dr. Mohammed Mahmoud Talal Mohaidat  & Dr. Kesavan Vadakalur Elumalai
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  8. Using Rhymes and Songs for Teaching Core Vocabulary to Elementary School Students
    Author/s: Gareebullah Hago Hamdoun Mudawi
    Abstract | Access Full Paper

‘Relationship between Psychological Theories and Recent Trends in Language Teaching: Some Observations’ by Dr. B. Sushma

Abstract

As teachers of English, we often discover new methods and techniques of teaching to make our learners learn better. The role of the teacher has shifted from teaching to enabling learning. Learners learn under various conditions and their learning depends on various factors such as motivation, psychological conditions, family, peers and environment around them. Learners exhibit variations in their way of learning language.  As such the teachers need to understand the psychology of their learners to make them free in expressing their thoughts, ideas confidently in the class which in turn enables them to get sufficient exposure to the language and gain proficiency. This paper concentrates on psychology for language teachers which helps the teachers gain insights into the way learners learn so that they can help them acquire an interest for learning and become independent learners. It focuses majorly on the relationship between psychological theories of language learning propounded by Cognitive psychologists such as Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner, Lev Vygotsky; Humanist Psychologists such as Eric Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Combs, Carl Rogers; and the methods involved in teaching language.

Index Terms: Cognitivism, Methods of Language Teaching, Language Proficiency, Psychology, Psychological theories.

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‘Self-Assessment of Oral Proficiency among ESL Learners’ by Dr. Smriti Singh

Abstract

In India English is an important language occupying a high position for a few reasons as mentioned here: meeting
new people and communicating with others, career and travel opportunities and improving one’s academic performance in other subjects. Teaching of any language requires an assessment to check its successful delivery. Generally assessments and exams are written in nature conducted by external bodies and test only a few language skills like writing and reading. Oral skills get neglected and good grades in writing or reading skills do not necessarily mean excellence in oral proficiency. This is where the role of self -assessment comes in. Self-assessment means judging the quality of your own performance based on specific criteria. This paper will discuss the benefits of self-assessment and try to answer the following: What oral proficiency is and how it relates to one’s language learning goals? What guidelines can be used to rate one’s speaking ability?

Index Terms: English in India, ELT, Self-assessment.

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