‘Dynamic Assessment: An Indication of Diagnostic Approach in Reading Comprehension of Iranian EFL Learners’ by Narges Zarinkamar & Jila Naeini

Abstract

The present study attempted to investigate the effectiveness of dynamic assessment on EFL students’ reading comprehension. The subjects included 60 female and male students of two different classes that were passing general English course at Alaodole Semnani Institute of higher education as control and experimental groups. In the experimental group, the intervention took place during four sessions. Some mediation like strategies were taught each session while going through a teacher made reading text. Meanwhile, the students’ development of reading comprehension was dynamically assessed. In the control group a traditional type of assessment was utilized; in other words, only a summative test was given to the participants. At the end of the experiment, the posttest was administrated to the both groups and then the result of the tests were compared and analyzed. The analyzed data showed that dynamic assessment had significant on reading comprehension of Iranian EFL learners.

Index Terms: Dynamic assessment, EFL learner, reading comprehension.

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‘Modification of Words and Vocabulary Learning Techniques’ by H. Naseema Parveen, S. Esther Cynthia & Dr. A.S. Mohamed Rafee

Abstract

This article explores the modification and significance of a word and a series of changes it undergoes in the form and meaning thereby originating into new words termed vocabulary. This modification or change occurs when there is an addition of a unit of a word or morpheme. The process it undergoes in the formation of a new vocabulary, its need and significance are clearly stated. Its implication in learning a language and a few recommendations are also discussed with the help of a few activities. The activities were experimented on rural and semi – urban students who were pursuing engineering courses at tertiary level. These activities helped them in comprehending the meaning and definition of vocabulary which was wrongly construed by them as high sounding or tough words. They were also able to use the modified words in different contexts thus developing their communicative competence thereby enhancing their level of confidence.

Index Terms: Modification, Formation, Vocabulary, Activities, Communicative Competence and Confidence.

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‘A Model for Translating Poetry Based on the Lefevere’s Theory on Poetry Translation and Dastjerdi’s Model’ by Forouzan Dehbashi Sharif & Ramin Yarmohamadi Khameneh

Abstract

Poetry translation involves cognition, discourse, and action by and between human and textual actors in a physical
and social setting. A poetry translation project usually aims to publicize a poet or poets. The issue of the translatability of poetry has given rise to theoretical and practical debates among scholars. Purpose of this study was to propose a model for the comparison of translations based on Lefevere’s theory and Dastjerdi’s model. The seven strategies proposed by Lefevere attempt to tackle the problems of translating poetic text and his model aims to study translation in the poetic genre on an empirical basis. They are founded in the belief that poetry is an item of beauty with specific poetic features. Destjerd’s model has two levels for poetry analysis: textual (linguistic) and extra-textual (cultural) levels. At the textual level he examines forms, sound, words, images, tone and content of a piece of poetry. At the extra-textual level, coherence and implicature are the elements to be discussed, here the main focus is the knowledge presented in the source text as well as the TT reader’s knowledge of the world; that is to say the cultural aspects of the text. Due to the analysis based on Lefevere’s theory and the practical model of poetry translation by Dastjerdi, researchers have proposed a model for the analysis of selected poems and comparing the performance of translators. In this study, the second translator’s performance was better than the other two because he was able to get a higher score in 4 parts.

Index Terms: Dastjerdi’s Model, Lefevere’s Theory, Poetry translation, Translator’s Performance.

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‘Using Films in the ESL Classroom to Improve Communication Skills of Non-Native Learners’ by Ms. Atiya Khan

Abstract

With the ever-increasing developments in audiovisual technologies, their uses are not limited to entertaining people anymore. In fact, audiovisual technologies could be incorporated in the classroom for second language acquisition. In line with that view, this article highlights the effectiveness of exposure to films on improving the speaking skills of non-native English language learners. The article implied that audiovisual technologies, such as films, generally are a great source for teaching spoken English and must be used more in non-native English language learning contexts.

Index Terms: ESL, communicative English, audiovisual technology, films

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‘Relationship between Writing, reading, and Translation’ by Hajar Khanmohammad & Mahboobeh Kehtari

Abstract

Everything in translation begins with a source language text which the translators must be able to read and to comprehend as an essential and basic requirement for carrying out successful translating. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between writing and reading in English, independently, and translating from English to Persian (E-P) and Persian to English (P-E) translation ability translation students. To this end, a TOEFL test (including reading and writing parts), an English to Persian translation test, and a Persian to English translation test were administered among 198 MA translation students of Central Tehran Branch of Islamic Azad University. Three raters corrected translation and the writing tests according to the required rubrics. The descriptive and inferential statistics confirmed that there is a significant relationship between reading in English and E-P translation, and writing in English and P-E translation. Furthermore, a regression analysis revealed that reading comprehension was a significant predictor of their E-P translation qualities, while writing was not. Moreover, considering the P-E translation as the predicted variable, it was revealed that both reading and writing could significantly predict P-E translation of the students. However, it was observed that writing makes a stronger contribution to P-E translation of the students.

Index Terms: assessment of translation, reading comprehension, writing.

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‘The Effect of Immediate and Delayed Pronunciation Error Correction on EFL Learners’ Speaking Anxiety ‘ by Ali Asghar Gharaghanipour, Arash Zareian & Fatemeh Behjat

Abstract

In the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA), classroom interaction has been widely discussed by teachers and researchers. In this field, different viewpoints on classroom interaction and discourse have been studied which have mainly concentrated on either teachers or students and their speech. When the focus sheds lights on language teaching and learning, and more specifically on learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL), the main issue is the language itself and how it is used in the interaction between students and teacher – student in the classroom. In the present study the focus was on the effect of immediate and delayed pronunciation error correction on EFL learners speaking anxiety. The participants in the study were sixty female intermediate EFL students, between 15 and 17 years old. A quasi-experimental research design was employed with a treatment lasting for a weeks on two intact groups—one experimental and one control group. They were then categorized as high and low proficient learners on the basis of the scores they gained in an OPT test.  the final result has stated that more proficient learners experienced less anxiety in class and they were more relaxed to answer the questions or participate in discussions The results of t-test indicated that there was a significant difference between the experimental group and the control group. It indicated that the high proficient learners with delayed error correction used more words per minute compared to low proficient ones. The result indicated that high proficient respondents were less likely to feel anxious about their errors in the language classroom, which means that proficiency, error making, and anxiety are interrelated

Index Terms: Error correction, pronunciation correction, speaking anxiety.

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‘Impact of Washback in English as Second Language Classrooms – An Investigation in the University of Jaffna – Sri Lanka’ by Dr M Saravanapava Iyer

Abstract

The manner in which public or in-house examinations affect teaching and learning processes in English as Second Language (ESL) classrooms is normally explained as “washback” or “backwash” (These terms are interchangeably used to denote the same meaning). Currently a large number of definitions have been suggested by language scholars for the notion “washback” right through the accessible researches and relevant literatures on ESL language testing. In this paper I prefer to employ the term “washback” alone to interpret the same situation. At the beginning, the present study attempts to focus on range of definitions of washback. Thereafter, it tries to recognize the parallel terms introduced by other language researchers; after having adequate discussion and reviewing on different definitions, the researcher’s ultimate aim of this paper is to introduce new views on washback with correct pedagogical implications for ESL practitioners; this fresh insight relevant to washback effect on teaching and learning process is doubtlessly believed to help language practitioners to implement the ESL programme effectively. The research method applied for this investigation is based on ethnographic perspective qualitative research components and the subjects for this investigation were thirty Tamil medium undergraduates in the Faculty of Arts, University of Jaffna, Sri Lanka.

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Volume 5 – Issue 4

  1. Impact of Washback in English as Second Language Classrooms – An Investigation in the University of Jaffna – Sri Lanka
    Author/s: Dr M Saravanapava Iyer
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  2. The Effect of Immediate and Delayed Pronunciation Error Correction on EFL Learners’ Speaking Anxiety
    Author/s: Ali Asghar Gharaghanipour, Arash Zareian & Fatemeh Behjat
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  3. Relationship between Writing, reading, and Translation
    Author/s: Hajar Khanmohammad & Mahboobeh Kehtari
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  4. Using Films in the ESL Classroom to Improve Communication Skills of Non-Native Learners
    Author/s: Ms. Atiya Khan
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  5. A Model for Translating Poetry Based on the Lefevere’s Theory on Poetry Translation and Dastjerdi’s Model
    Authors: Forouzan Dehbashi Sharif & Ramin Yarmohamadi Khameneh
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  6. Modification of Words and Vocabulary Learning Techniques
    Authors: H. Naseema Parveen, S. Esther Cynthia & Dr. A.S. Mohamed Rafee
    Abstract | Access Full Paper
  7. Dynamic Assessment: An Indication of Diagnostic Approach in Reading Comprehension of Iranian EFL Learners
    Authors: Narges Zarinkamar & Jila Naeini
    Abstract | Access Full Paper