‘The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Language Learning Strategies of Iranian EFL Learners’ by Seyyed Rasool Mirghasempour & Mohammad Rajabpour

Abstract

Following the introduction of new approaches in the area of intelligence- intelligence quotient, multiple intelligence, and recently the emergence of emotional intelligence- the emotional intelligence (henceforth EI) is taken into consideration as a crucial factor in the domains of learning and teaching, nowadays. The present study was intended to find the relationship between EI and using language learning strategies. To achieve this goal, initially 55 language learners at upper-intermediate level from four classes of boys and girls in an English language institute in Iran were randomly selected. Then, the Dominoes-70 test, aka D-70, was administered to homogenize the learners based on their IQ level. Next, through D-70, 48 homogenous students with the same level of intelligent quotient were assigned to this study. Subsequently, the Bar-On Emotional Quotient inventory (Bar-On EQ-i) and Oxford’s Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) were administered in order to obtain the participants’ total level of EI and also to identify different learning strategies that learners use in their learning process, respectively. To analyze the data, the Pearson correlational coefficient and independent t-test were used. Results suggest that: 1. There is not a meaningful difference between males and females in their use of language learning strategies. 2. There is a significant relationship between the students’ total level of EI and language learning strategies both in females and males. 3. There is not a significant difference regarding the subjects’ total level of EI and their genders.

Index Terms: Dominoes-70, Emotional Intelligence (EI), EFL learner, Language Learning Strategies.

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‘The Effect of Planning Pre-writing vs. Post-writing Task on Iranian In-termediate EFL Learners’ Paragraph Writing Ability’ by Pegah Doroudi & Morad Bagherzadeh Kasmani

Abstract

The present study sought to investigate the effect of pre-writing versus post-writing task on Iranian EFL learners’ paragraph writing ability. 45 intermediate students were selected via administering the OPT, then they divided into three groups of 15 and were randomly assigned to two experimental and one control groups. A pretest of writing was administered to all groups, after that, the researcher applied the pre-writing task for experimental group1  and post-writing task for experimental group 2 for 10 sessions while there was no treatment for the control group. A posttest of writing was then administered to all three groups and the data were analyzed a paired-samples T-test and ANOVA coefficients. The results of the study indicated that the participants performed better when they took part in a test after they were treated with pre-writing and post-writing tasks.

Index Terms: task, pre-writing, post-writing, writing skill.

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‘Exploring Language Teacher’s Roles: Personal Theories and Practices’ by Satyawan Polist

Abstract

The role and function of the language teacher has been a matter of continuous debate and discussion. A teacher, across the language teaching history, has emerged as Passive Technician, Reflective Practitioners, and Transformative Intellectuals. The teacher has been variously referred to as an artist and an architect; a scientist and a psychologist; a manager and a mentor; a controller and a counselor; a sage on the stage; a guide on the side. Every teacher has personal beliefs that bring the unique contribution to the learning situation. Teachers are not merely passive technician who dutifully execute a given set of teaching procedures rather active participants in the creation of classroom realities. A teacher assumes various roles like classroom management, interaction with learners, error correction and evaluation. Apart from this, managing large classes and use of technology in the class is another challenge for the teacher. An in-service teacher training is essential for teachers’ professional development and teaching competences.

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‘Understanding the Role of Listening in Academic Vocabulary Instruction – An Inquiry’ by Karthickeyen Govindaraj

Abstract

This paper is divided into two sections. The first section – in restricting its focus to students learning English for Academic Purposes (EAP) – outlines the importance of listening as a learning-teaching tool in vocabulary acquisition with an emphasis on the Academic Word List (AWL). This is achieved by reviewing current literature surveying the nexus between cognition and listening in the word-learning process (Anderson, 1995). The review points out that while promoting the AWL via aural activities has its merits, students’ listening competence, learning styles and working memory will both arbitrate and in tandem determine these activities’ success in the EAP classroom. The second section questions the efficacy of bridging theory with practice by assessing a lesson plan influenced by memory, cognitive and compensation strategies (Oxford, 1989). This hypothetical lesson will discuss an in-class activity that helps promote the AWL to the EAP learner, via a listening-based exercise focused on the identification of discourse markers in lectures. Drawing attention to both strengths and limitations of the stated exercise, the paper concludes with the argument that the success of any AWL-led listening-based vocabulary activity is dependent on its integration with other receptive (reading) and productive (writing and speaking) learning skills.

Index Terms: Listening, Vocabulary acquisition, Academic Word List, English for Academic Purposes.

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