‘Feedback and Learning English Collocation’ by Fatemeh Alipanahi & Maryam Naghiloo

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of feedbacks on collocation learning by intermediate EFL learners. Fifty five intermediate EFL learners from a language institute constituted the participants of the study. They were females, aging from 17 to23. Oxford Placement Test (OPT) (2004) was administered to the population to have participants of approximately equal level of English language proficiency. 42 homogenous learners were selected and were randomly assigned into three experimental groups. . Then, in order to choose the unfamiliar collocations to be instructed during experiment—the researcher selected 140 collocations and administered them to the selected learners. There were 100 collocations with which learners were unfamiliar. During the instruction, each group received one type of feedback; Group A received direct feedback, Group B received indirect feedback, and Group C received self-correction feedback. There was no control group. At the end, a post-test was administrated to the groups. The results of One-Way ANOVA and Paired-Samples t-test revealed that feedbacks had positive effect on collocation learning of the students; however, students in indirect feedback group outperformed the direct and self-correction feedback groups. The results can lead EFL teachers and practitioners to carefully examine specific educational context and learners’ needs before the application of different feedbacks.

Index Terms: Collocation, Direct feedback, Indirect feedback, Self-correction feedback.

Access full paper.

‘Methods to Post Method: Need for Overhauling Teacher Education’ by Dr. Sanjiv Kumar Choudhary & Rajni Singh

Abstract

Attempts have been made to find a solution for bridging the gap between the actual and the expected outcomes of English language teaching at various levels. ELT experts over the time have tried to address this issue by prescribing and implementing new teaching approaches and methods because an effective English teaching was thought to be about using a method correctly by applying its prescribed principles and techniques. However at the end of 20th century Professor Kumaravadivelu’s concept of Post Method has initiated a fresh discussion on relevance of teaching approaches and methods. Today the discussion on Post Method teaching has gained enormous significance since both teachers as well as students are coming to the class everyday with lots of new experiences gained by using Information and Communication Technology (ICT).This paper tries to examine the existing teacher education programme in the light of current discussion on Post Method English language teaching and highlights the need for overhauling it so that it could address the challenges arising due to emergence and growth of ICT.

Index Terms: ELT, Post Method, ICT, teacher education programme, new challenges.

Access full paper.

‘Recent Developments in ESP and its challenges’ by Rashmi Rekha Borah

Abstract

Language-centered and learning-centered approaches to course design are the outcome of the final reason of origin of ESP, which believe in the principle that learning is totally determined by the learners. Teaching English language is a great profession nowadays. However, it does not always carry success stories. What the learners need to learn when they set out on the task of learning the English language? Is using technology which is the trend now in ELT would suffice the need of the students in a country like India. The teaching and learning process has been affected by the fast development in science, economy and technology (internet communications tools) and of course from increasing contact with the whole world. That is why the significance of English is growing, it is emerging to be the international language.  ESP has come up with lots of developments over the years recent being the technology enhanced learning. The focal point has been shifted from the teacher to the learner. In ESP online learning is seen as a complement and extension of classical forms of learning. However the paper revolves around the fact that not even the best online course can fully replace the personal contact with a teacher, or the human relationships that develop in a group. So, online learning can facilitate traditional learning but cannot replace or eliminate the teacher for the all-round development of the learner as far as enhancing the language skills of the learners are concerned.

Index Terms: ESP, English Language Teaching.

Access full paper.

‘Scopes and implications of Strategic Competence for improving oral skills of Bangladeshi English language learners’ by Md. Jahirul Islam & Ziaul Hasan

Abstract

A prevalent notion is voiced continually by the educators, guardians and ELT practitioner that despite having a substantial amount of formal education, instructions and practice in English, learners’ oral skills have not developed. While studying M.A in ELT, I came across to the terminology ‘Strategic Competence’ (SC) from the paper of Thurrell and Dorneyi and learnt about its efficacy in terms of promoting the fluency and conversational skills. Hence, this paper is a sort of feasibility study of the scopes and implications of SC in terms of improving the oral skills of Bangladeshi English Language Learners (BELLs) who seemed to be plagued by the lack of fluency and conversational skills. In this paper, at first, I will look at SC and its significance in the efficient oral communication then at the existing problems of the Bangladeshi Speaking skill teaching and learning programs and finally the potentials and implications of SC in terms of developing the oral skills of BELLs.

Index Terms: ELT Learners, English Language Teaching.

Access full paper.

‘On-The-Job Training Courses and EFL Teachers’ Reflection’ by Elham Babaee & Davood Mashhadi Heidar

Abstract

Considering the importance of teachers’ ability in thinking and solving classroom problems, the current study aimed at finding the effects of on-the-job training courses on teachers’ reflection. For this purpose, 20 teachers were selected and these subjects were randomly divided into two experimental and control groups. The researcher gave a pretest of reflection to both groups of teachers to obtain information on the teachers’ attitudes toward reflection and reflective teaching. Then the experimental group took part in in-service training program, but control group continued their job by existing method. When the OJT course was over, the posttest of reflection was administered among both experimental and control groups. Paired-sample t-Test and Independent sample t-Test between the scores of pretest and posttest were used to analyse and calculate the scores. The results of statistical analysis showed that there was a great progress in the reflection ability of those teachers who took part in teachers’ training course.

Index Terms: EFL Learners, On-the-job Training, Reflection, Teacher.

Access full paper.

‘The Evolution of the Modern Classroom in the Context of ELT’ by Dr. G. Varalakshmi

Abstract

English has been taught as a second language or a foreign language and the teaching methods adopted faced drastic metamorphosis as per the need and use of English.  English Language Teaching (ELT) in the present context is the combination of academic study of language to understand the content and communication with practical training. The main aim of ELT is to prepare students to acquire English language skills, listening, speaking, reading and writing, to get prepared for a wide range of career opportunities with enhanced critical and analytical thinking. The slow transitional changes from traditional chalk and talk to modern connect and react methods radically changed the concept of teaching and each phase has its own significance and role to lead to the next step in modifying the teachers’ and learners’ participation. The human potential and resourcefulness of the teacher was considered as the criteria for effective classroom teaching, especially foreign language teaching till the 20th century. But this millennium with the expanded technological advances changed the face of classroom instruction. This research paper discusses the phases of change in learning English along with the changes in pedagogy and aims at showing the positive side of the integration of pedagogy and technology towards the evolution of modern classroom in the context of ELT.

Index Terms: academic study, communication with practical training, expanded technological advances, integration of pedagogy and technology, evolution of modern classroom.

Access full paper.

‘The Effect of Teachers’ Beliefs on Improving Students’ English Language Vocabulary’ by Fatemeh Deilami & Hossein Pourghasemian

Abstract

Teachers’ beliefs are important for pursuing and improving English language learning, especially the vocabulary case. They closely guide language teachers to adopt their teaching strategies for coping with their daily language teaching challenges to elevate and accelerate the learning of English language words. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the use of teachers’ beliefs during studies improves students’ learning of English language words .This research was conducted with 40 male EFL learners of 18-30, studying at Safir Institute, Karaj branch. To determine its homogeneity, the researcher performed a proficiency test. They were set into control and experimental groups. The experimental group was presented with the treatment which were the teachers’ beliefs during the class, while working on memorizing words and its meanings as well as sentences in which the vocabularies were used, while the control group was given no treatment. It was continued for two sessions a week, and four weeks per month. A T-test, using SPSS, was administered to show the possible differences available between the two groups. It was understood that the students improved, memorized and remembered significantly more words while they had the teachers’ beliefs.

Index Terms: Experimental groups, Teachers’ beliefs, T-Test, Vocabulary.

Access full paper.

‘Changing Priorities in Pronunciation Teaching in ESL Classroom’ by G. Prashanti & K. Durga Bhavani

Abstract

The growing importance of English as an international language and as a global lingua franca is observable virtually in all countries of the world from its increasing status in educational curricula to its role as the language of international business, tourism, news broadcasting etc. In the specific case of India, the recognition by the government of the growing importance of English can be seen in the increasing number of schools in which the medium of instruction is English. This paper explores in-service teachers’ attitudes towards pronunciation teaching and the appropriate models and norms to be followed in ELT. The article reports the findings of an empirical study conducted with secondary school English language teachers.

Keywords: ESL, ELT, pronunciation teaching.

Access full paper.

‘Teaching Phonemic Symbols in English with the Help of Content Based Instruction at Tertiary Level’ by B. Ramya Devi & B. Lalitha Devi

Abstract

In language classrooms at tertiary level, learners face problems in remembering the phonemic symbols which may result in mispronunciation and further affect their speech habits. In large classrooms it is often difficult for the teacher to give individual attention. For this purpose a teaching technique was developed which helps students in recognizing the symbols and remembering them for a long time. This was done with the help of content based instruction. The technique draws information from another discipline i.e. ‘Mathematics’ to explain the concept in language class i.e. ‘phonemic symbols’. This technique makes teaching more learner-centered and may further leads to self-learning.

Keywords: phonemic symbols, content based instruction.

Access full paper.