‘Evaluation of Two ESP textbooks for Nursing Students’ – Fatemeh Alipanahi & Neda Ghorbani

Abstract

This study aimed at evaluating the quality of two ESP textbooks: English for the Students of Nursing and Medical Terminology, and also comparing them from the viewpoints of students and teachers who used them in order to provide a clear picture of the current status of these textbooks. In this research, two forms of survey questionnaires were utilized to elicit the viewpoints of the participants including 54 nursing students and 1 teacher. Students’ questionnaire comprised of 23 items and teacher’s questionnaire comprised of 38 items which explored 7 main parts: practical considerations, layout and design, activities, skills, language type, subject and content and conclusion. There were also the students’ profile and needs analysis forms. Three kinds of computations were done on the gathered data: per-statement analysis, per-classification analysis, and two paired samples t-test to elicit the attitudes of the students and their teacher regarding these two textbooks, ESN and MT. The results indicated that teacher and students were not satisfied with most of the criteria which English for the Students of Nursing should fulfill. Moreover, the results showed no significant difference between the students’ and teacher’s opinions.

Index Terms: ESP; Materials; Materials evaluation; Textbook evaluation.

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‘The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Reading Com-prehension of Iranian EFL Learners’ – Fatemeh Alipanahi & Hadis Tariverdi

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between reading comprehension and emotional intelligence (EI). In addition, the present study focuses on different components of EI and different correlations that they may have with reading comprehension. To do so, PET (2011) as proficiency test was given to 72 upper-intermediate EFL learners majoring in English Translation at Zanjan University. From among them, 50 learners constituted the participants of the study. Then, the researcher administered the Bar-On’s (1995) Emotional Quotient Inventory and a reading comprehension test to the participants to investigate any relationship between EI and reading. These administrations also led to investigating the possible relationship between different components of EI and reading. Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a significant relationship between EI and reading comprehension (r=.68). Similarly, a significant correlation was found between EI subscales and reading comprehension (r= .71).The findings of this study can lead EFL teachers and language planners to think of effective and sensitive instruction methodologies and materials through identifying and understanding students’ significant individual differences. As findings show, emotional intelligence is one of the various aspects of the individual differences whose fostering can assist students in adapting to the environmental demands and pressures of the college environment.

Index Terms: emotional intelligence, reading comprehension, EFL learners.

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‘Feedback and Learning English Collocation’ by Fatemeh Alipanahi & Maryam Naghiloo

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of feedbacks on collocation learning by intermediate EFL learners. Fifty five intermediate EFL learners from a language institute constituted the participants of the study. They were females, aging from 17 to23. Oxford Placement Test (OPT) (2004) was administered to the population to have participants of approximately equal level of English language proficiency. 42 homogenous learners were selected and were randomly assigned into three experimental groups. . Then, in order to choose the unfamiliar collocations to be instructed during experiment—the researcher selected 140 collocations and administered them to the selected learners. There were 100 collocations with which learners were unfamiliar. During the instruction, each group received one type of feedback; Group A received direct feedback, Group B received indirect feedback, and Group C received self-correction feedback. There was no control group. At the end, a post-test was administrated to the groups. The results of One-Way ANOVA and Paired-Samples t-test revealed that feedbacks had positive effect on collocation learning of the students; however, students in indirect feedback group outperformed the direct and self-correction feedback groups. The results can lead EFL teachers and practitioners to carefully examine specific educational context and learners’ needs before the application of different feedbacks.

Index Terms: Collocation, Direct feedback, Indirect feedback, Self-correction feedback.

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‘Feedback and Writing Performance of Iranian EFL Learners’ by Fatemeh Alipanahi

Abstract

Researchers working in educational settings are increasingly paying attention to the role students’ thoughts and beliefs play in the learning process. Teacher/student feedback and students self-efficacy, as key elements of social cognitive theory, appear to be an important variable because it affects students’ motivation and learning. This article investigates empirical literature about the role of student and teacher feedbacks in EFL writing performance. It also explored the relationship between learners’ self-feedback and increasing their self-efficacy. Ninety advanced Iranian EFL learners were chosen as the participant of this study based on their performance on Oxford Quick Placement Test. After pretest 48 students were randomly divided into two groups: control group received teacher-feedback for their writings and the experimental group received self-feedback on their performance. The results of parametric statistics suggested no difference in writing ability of the participants receiving self or teacher-feedback, but the results showed that applying self-feedback strategies increased learners’ self-efficacy.  The results also indicated that educational programs have the possibility to enhance students’ self-efficacy, and programs based on self feedbacks proved to be particularly successful. Several factors appeared to influence students’ self-efficacy and provided evidence of the potency of the main sources of self-efficacy. Directions for future research are indicated.

Index Terms: self-feedback, self-efficacy, teacher-feedback, writing ability.

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‘Soft Skills Training – Necessity or Hype’ by Alireza Sohrabi, Fatemeh Alipanahi & Mohammad Reza Orouji

Abstract

Lecturing as a subcategory of speaking performance is one of the essential and inevitable needs of students in various academic fields, particularly for EFL students. There are multiple determinant factors which can affect lecturing and speaking performances. In this study, two important factors such as self-esteem and lexical knowledge were investigated. The current study aimed to compare the relationship among the three variables of self-esteem, lexical knowledge, and lecturing. Our purpose was to observe how students with different levels of self-esteem and with varying mastery in lexical knowledge would deliver their lectures and to know if these two factors really affect lecturing.  In so doing, a standard Cambridge lexical knowledge test as well as Sorensen self-esteem test were conducted. Accordingly, the students were divided into four groups. The analyses of the obtained data indicated a statistically significant differences among the students with: 1) high lexical knowledge – high self-esteem and students with 2) high lexical knowledge-low-esteem and students with 3) low lexical knowledge-low self-esteem and students with 4) low lexical knowledge-high self-esteem. The groups with high lexical knowledge outperformed the low lexical knowledge group. The findings of the current study can have beneficial conceptions for both second language students and teachers particularly those who fail to find out the defects in the requirements of oral performances such as inadequate lexical knowledge.

Key words: Self-esteem, Lexical Knowledge, Lecturing

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